Jillianne

Jillianne Hamilton is a history enthusiast, author, graphic designer, paper crafter and artist living on Canada's beautiful east coast.

The History of Sex: A Brief Timeline

Since it’s almost Valentine’s Day, I think it’s time. Let’s talk about sex. I previously did a timeline post about the Salem Witch Trials. It was a fascinating way of seeing the build up to the event, the climax and then the descent back to normality, which reminded me of doing this type of post. WINK, WINK. Let’s go back to the beginning, shall we? 15,000 …

Era Nicknames and What They Mean

There were a few historical era names I wasn’t sure about: where they landed in history, why they were called that and what happened during that time. I investigated. Note: Many of these events relate to European (particularly western European). If you want to add some history to this post or if there is an era you think should be included here, leave it in …

Historical Letter Writing Role-Playing

While preparing my recent blog post on costume bloggers, I came across a blog post on A Most Peculiar Mademoiselle where she briefly mentioned joining a “letter exchange role play.” I contacted her to find out more info. She and a group of other Jane Austen (almost exclusively Swedish) fans gathered in a Facebook group. Each person creates a fictional persona, posts some details of …

Review: England’s Mistress: The Infamous Life of Emma Hamilton

I decided to pick up the audiobook for England’s Mistress: The Infamous Life of Emma Hamilton by Kate Williams because I enjoy tales of 18th century aristocrats and, well, my young niece is named Emma Hamilton. And who doesn’t love a good story about a mistress? England’s Mistress is probably one of my favorite books I’ve read this year. I’m ashamed to say I’d never heard of Emma, Lady Hamilton …

10 Gift Ideas for History Geeks

It wouldn’t be the pre-holiday season without a lame-ass listicle featuring gift ideas. So here’s ours! Lovers of history range in their styles of showing that love, so here are a few varied ideas for different types of history lovers, the subtle history enthusiasts to the out-and-proud geeks. 1. Books This is probably the most “Well, DUHHHHH” item on this list. But I am going to …

5 Historical Costume Bloggers You Should Follow

Although it’s probably a little late to start on your historical Halloween costume at this point, you can still drool over the costumes made by these amazing bloggers. Most of these bloggers are also on Pinterest and Instagram, so don’t forget to follow them on social media too. Note: all of the photos below belong to the bloggers and/or the original photographers. (Additional note: if my …

Review: Victoria

The eight-episode run of Victoria just finished on ITV and I’m so glad it’s been renewed for a second season and a Christmas special, both due out in 2017. Victoria, starring Jenna Coleman (Doctor Who, Death Comes to Pemberley) as the stoic monarch of the 1800s, is a dramatic look at the early years of Queen Victoria’s reign. Series 1 includes her transition from sheltered princess to teen …

Aboard a 17th Century Spanish Galleon

El Galeon, a replica of a 17th century Spanish galleon, was docked in Georgetown, Prince Edward Island for three days and I jumped at the chance to climb aboard and take some photos. The galleon was the choice vehicle for merchants and pirates alike. Photo from the El Galeon website From the website: “El Galeon was built during 2009 to 2010 by the Nao Victoria Foundation. …

Review: Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings

In most books concerning Tudor history, Mary Boleyn gets very little mention. A lot more is known about her enigmatic and doomed younger sister but thanks to author Alison Weir (one of my very favorite history writers), we finally have a biography about a woman history knows best as a “great and infamous whore,” probably a title she doesn’t deserve. This book details the historical …

5 Films Based in Georgian England

Anyone for a game of Whist? Although Tudor England will always be my favorite time/place in history, I’ve had a dalliance with the Georgian period. For the aristocracy, Georgian England (1714-1830) was all about “taking the cure” at Bath, enjoying the poetry of Keats, Byron and Burns and reading about major societal changes in other parts of the world: England lost their grasp of America in 1776 …