Women’s History Category Archives

Review: Marilyn Monroe: The Biography

I feel guilty for believing all the things people have said about Marilyn Monroe. Marilyn Monroe had an affair with Robert Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy. Marilyn Monroe was a “dumb blonde,” capable of only playing “dumb blonde” roles. Marilyn Monroe only had her beauty and her figure and no actual talent. Marilyn Monroe’s relationship with baseball player Joe DiMaggio was a perfect storybook romance. Marilyn …

Review: Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire

I should have known better than to have trusted a historical biopic. I really should know better by now. Since seeing it for the first time a few years ago, I have loved The Duchess. It’s a gorgeous movie starring Kiera Knightley as Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire. The movie is loosely based on Amanda Foreman’s biography, Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire. And I do mean loosely. Don’t …

Marie Antoinette Month: Marie Antoinette (Part II)

(View Part 1 of Marie Antoinette’s life here.) Marie Antoinette had always loved children and the pressure to conceive royal heirs came from so many angles, so the stress from this put strain on the couple’s relationship. Sources vary on the reason why the delay (some say lack of sexual education, other historians claim Louis-Auguste had a problem with his equipment), but the couple finally consummated the …

Marie Antoinette Month: Marie Antoinette (Part I)

Since today is Marie Antoinette‘s birthday (the ripe old age of 260), I decided to make the whole month about my favorite doomed French queen. The posts to follow in this series will span the month of November and will relate to the people who were close to her during her life: her mother, her husband, her friends and more. Keep in mind, I didn’t …

Month of Macabre: The “From Hell” Letter

On October 15, 1888, George Lusk (then the head of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee) received a letter in the mail. It was delivered with half of a human kidney. The letter read: From hell Mr Lusk Sor I send you half the Kidne I took from one women prasarved it for you tother pirce I fried and ate it was very nise I may send …

Month of Macabre: A Timeline of the Salem Witch Trials

October 12th marks the 323rd anniversary of the end of the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. Salem, Massachusetts is famous for the witch trials and the city currently draws in tourists who come to experience the macabre location first-hand. Witch hunts are mentioned in law texts from ancient Egypt but became common practice in Europe between 1450 and 1750. As many as 100,000 people were executed for …

Mark your calendars! October 13th is Ada Lovelace Day

This year marks the seventh annual Ada Lovelace Day which celebrates women who work within STEM fields. You can learn more about the history of the event here. Ada Lovelace (Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, that is) is known as the world’s first computer programmer. The daughter of Lord Byron (yes, the Lord Byron), Ada was interested in math and science from a very young age. She and …

Review: The Girls of Murder City: Lame, Lust and the Beautiful Killers Who Inspired Chicago

The Girls of Murder City: Fame, Lust and the Beautiful Killers Who Inspired Chicago by Douglas Perry I’m a CHICAGO musical fan and generally enjoy stories about lady criminals, so this was a must-read for me. I really enjoyed it. The Girls of Murder City tells the story of, mainly, three women: playwright and reporter Maureen Watkins and two glamorous murderesses, Belva Gaertner and Beulah Annan. Watkins …

Marie Antoinette’s Scandalous Portrait

During Marie Antoinette’s life, she went through a few phases, as we all do as we grow up. As an adult, Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, took a liking to what she thought of as a simpler lifestyle. She began dressing in simpler gowns and her hairstyles became more tame and less… towering. In 1783, she had the architect Richard Mique build a country retreat for her, known …